Our Summer Vacation: Using Your Voice

OUR WRITING ROADMAPTwo weeks ago we started our writing summer vacation by talking about plotting. Today, I want to address how you are going to tell your story–what voice are you going to use?

I write my current series in first person, from the point of view of amateur sleuth Ruth Clagan. I only use first person. The pros of this choice? She is my protagonist, and first person lets her voice ring out loud and clear. She sets the tone for the scenes. Cons of this choice? She has to be in every scene. If she isn’t present, then a scene needs to described to her, which can be very boring since it doesn’t allow her to experience it.

First person also does something else–it gives the reader the perspective of the narrator. Her prejudices are passed on without editorial comment. There is always a perspective involved, and that impacts the reader expectations.

The other choice is third person. Even then there are choices. Close third person still slants towards a specific perspective on the story, since it will often focus on one character as the center of the narrative. Omniscient third person is like a camera that doesn’t use close ups. Everyone is always in the frame. There is no specific point of view.

You can change points of view within a novel. Jessica Estevao’s new book, Whispers Beyond the Veil (due out in September) is told in first person and third person. Agatha Christie used third person, moving from close to omniscient. Murder on the Orient Express is a great example of that technique. First person doesn’t mean the narrator has to be the center of the story–see how Nick Carraway tells The Great Gatsby, and the effect of that choice by Fitzgerald. Always remember, writing is a craft that is honed over time. Playing with points of view will come easier over time. Or, maybe, it will be less scary.

Your choice of point of view determines your story in a lot of ways. One thing I’ve found is that when a story isn’t working for whatever reason, I change the POV and that usually helps. I’m not going to say one is easier or better than another. What I am saying it that one choice is the correct one for your story. It’s up to you to figure that out.

Given the plot you’ve worked out, how are you going to tell that story?

Friends, there is a Goodreads Giveaway this week (through July 9) for my next novel. You can enter to win here at the link.

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Julianne Holmes writes the Clock Shop Mystery series for Berkley Prime Crime. She also blogs with the Wicked Cozy Authors, and starting in July will appear on Killer Characters on the 20th of every month. Her next novel, Clock and Dagger, will be released on August 2.

One thought on “Our Summer Vacation: Using Your Voice

  1. Pingback: Our Summer Vacation: Pitching Your Book | Live to Write – Write to Live

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