Writer’s Weekend Resources – Reading and Writing Links

A fiery sunflower to brighten your day.

A fiery sunflower to brighten your day.

Morning & happy Sunday.

While yesterday’s post was a little on the darker side, today’s will be – I hope – a little lighter. While I’m all for baring our souls and sharing our true feelings, I’m not much for wailing or wallowing. So – onward & upward. Acknowledge the challenges, and then get back to the work at hand. The Big Questions never really have black & white answers anyway, do they? They always exist as questions, and we live our lives in pursuit of the answers, which change as we change.

ANYway … I hope you enjoy this weeks selection of blog posts and other reads.

Happy Sunday & happy writing and reading!

_jamie sig

 

 


 Books I’m Reading:

bk-being-thereI don’t know why, but I’ve been thinking about the film adaptation of Being There for a few weeks now. In the movie version of Jerzy Kosinski’s 1971 novel, the part of the story’s antihero is played flawlessly by Peter Sellers, probably one of the only actors who could have done justice to the character of Chance the Gardener/Chauncy Gardiner.

Though I haven’t found time to re-watch the movie, I did buy the Audible edition of Being There, which is narrated by Dustin Hoffman. From the website’s description:

Chance, the enigmatic gardener, becomes Chauncey Gardiner after getting hit by a limo belonging to a Wall Street tycoon. The whirlwind that follows brings Chance to his new status of political policy advisor and possible vice presidential candidate. His garden-variety political responses, inspired by television, become heralded as visionary, and he is soon a media icon due to his unknown background and vague, yet appealing, conversational nature. 

From what I recall of the movie, it takes some liberties with Kosinski’s original work, but I found both versions to be very enjoyable and thought provoking. The novel has a few slightly racy scenes, though the fact that they are described through Chance’s limited perspective makes them almost clinical in nature. Hoffman was the perfect choice as narrator, moving seamlessly from Chance’s sense of bewilderment to the self-assured perspective of the people who take it upon themselves to interpret Chance’s words in the context of their own self-importance.

Being There is a story that has held up over time. It’s both tragic and hysterical, blending observations on the nature of humanity and the machinations of the worlds of politics and finance. Definitely worth reading. Though, Chance would definitely recommend watching. He likes to watch.

··• )o( •··

My Favorite Blog Reads for the Week:

CRAFT

PUBLISHING & MARKETING

INSPIRATION

THE WRITING LIFE

Sundry Links and Articles:

Quentin Blake illustration for Dahl's classic children's book, James and The Giant Peach

Quentin Blake illustration for Dahl’s classic children’s book, James and The Giant Peach

The Dark Side of Roald Dahl

It was Roald Dahl’s birthday last week. The acclaimed author would have been 100 years old last Tuesday. I’ve long been a fan of his stories, without really giving much thought to how macabre they are, and without giving any thought to who Dahl was as a man. This piece by Hephzibah Anderson for the BBC provides an interesting look behind the beloved children’s books that have become such a cornerstone of so many childhoods, as both novels and movie adaptations.

Anderson writes,

There was undoubtedly an element of provocation in much of his nastiness, both on and off the page. As the lives of the likes of Lewis Carroll, Margaret Wise Brown, and CS Lewis illustrate, to write brilliantly for children, an author must retain an element of the childlike. Sometimes, that blurs into childishness. To quote Dahl himself, the children’s author “must like simple tricks and jokes and riddles and other childish things”.

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paintbrushesIf You Want Your Children to Survive the Future, Send Them to Art School

This piece by Dustin Timbrook made me break my personal ban on reading the Huffington Post.  The general premise of the article as that we’re headed for a future without jobs, at least without jobs in the traditional sense. Between the automation of so many tasks and the removal of gatekeepers from creative and business models across the globe, Timbrook believes that creativity will become one of, if not the, most valuable commodities anyone can deliver.

Here’s just one thought-provoking excerpt:

No healthy child is born without an innate sense of wonder about their world. However, this childhood compulsion to explore is a bud quickly snipped by adults conditioned to fear the unknown. The tradition of discouraging unusual questions and behavior in children is so pervasive that we have come to view those who survive with their creativity intact as having a “gift.” What is more absurd is our amazement at the correlation of great artists and mental illness, as if the battle for self-expression which artists so tenaciously endure has no causal link to their psychic well-being.

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Finally, a quote for the week:

pin-my-damn-world

Here’s to making your own way and your own world, facing whatever challenges come your way, and retaining your childlike qualities.
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Jamie Lee Wallace Hi. I’m Jamie. I am a content writer and branding consultant, columnist, sometime feature writer, prolific blogger, and aspiring fiction writer. I’m a mom, a student of equestrian arts, and a nature lover. I believe in small kindnesses, daily chocolate, and happy endings. Introduce yourself on FacebookTwitter, Instagram, or Pinterest. I don’t bite … usually.
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Photo Credit – paintbrushes: barnimages.com via Compfight cc

5 thoughts on “Writer’s Weekend Resources – Reading and Writing Links

  1. Pingback: Writer’s Weekend Resources – Reading and Writing Links — Live to Write – Write to Live | Le Bien-Etre au bout des Doigts

  2. Reblogged this on Mister Journalism: "Reading, Sharing, Discussing, Learning" and commented:
    Here’s to making your own way and your own world, facing whatever challenges come your way, and retaining your childlike qualities.
    .
    Jamie Lee Wallace Hi. I’m Jamie. I am a content writer and branding consultant, columnist, sometime feature writer, prolific blogger, and aspiring fiction writer. I’m a mom, a student of equestrian arts, and a nature lover. I believe in small kindnesses, daily chocolate, and happy endings. Introduce yourself on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or Pinterest. I don’t bite … usually.

  3. Suddenly Jamie, what I’m flabbergasted by, what I’m wondering about and want to ask you about is how the hell do you find the time to read so much? And have the time to write about it?

    • You made me laugh, David. 🙂

      I guess that my “secret” is that I don’t FIND time, I MAKE it; and I do so because I love reading and I love writing. I love learning (by reading blogs) enough that I spend 30 – 45 minutes each night scanning 100 or so posts and reading maybe 20 of them. I love stories enough that I find nooks and crannies in my day to read or listen to novels and short stories and very short stories. (I often use audio books to maximize my “reading” time: https://nhwn.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/short-and-sweet-advice-for-writers-stealing-time-to-read/). I also use reading as a bribe … as I work my way through the day’s copywriting tasks, I bookmark articles I want to read, but don’t let myself indulge until I’ve hit a certain milestone or shipped a certain deliverable. That way, I have extra motivation to get my work done AND I get to justify spending time during the work day reading non-work stuff. 😉

  4. Glad you bounced back with a vengeance 🙂 Your sunflower alone was enough to energize me, and I like the subject of future “surviving the future” for the next generations. So little thought given to the issue by economists, politicians et al who just worry about GDP growth…

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