Career Expectations for Artistic Pursuits

One of my jobs is teaching arts management. I love teaching, and enjoy passing on knowledge I’ve gleaned from 30 years in the field. I focus primarily on theater, more broadly on the performing arts. Over the years, it has morphed from a “these are the business models” structured class to a “here are the challenges and opportunities to making a life in the arts.” I’ve written about arts funding, and speak about it often in my role as executive director of an arts service organization.  The path to success in the performing arts is a tough one.

I am also a mystery writer who realized her dream of being published last year. This year has been about releasing book 2, finishing book 3, and figuring out how to stay published by working with my agent to noodle new ideas. I love this part of my life. It takes work, and focus, but it gives me great joy.

But here’s the thing. Right now, I can’t make my living as a fiction writer. I can make it part of my portfolio career, but resting all my eggs in that basket? The numbers don’t work.

A few weeks ago a friend recommended the book Born To This by Chris Guillebeau. He talks about the three legs of a career–money, joy, and flow. Flow is doing something you are good at, joy makes you happy, money supports you. Your career should be an equal mix of all three.

I’ve been thinking a lot about this. Am I less of a writer because I can’t support myself writing? Is a actor less of an artist because she pays the bills by teaching? Is a musician less of a musician because she is also a lawyer? Are some artistic pursuits more worthy than others? Or does expecting your art/craft to provide joy AND flow AND money put too much pressure on your art/craft? Is it okay to have to do two or three things in order to achieve balance?

It is more than okay, as long as it works. That is the real challenge, making sure it works for me, not for what expectations are for me.

As 2016 winds down to a close, I am thinking about joy, flow, and money. I’m also thinking about my goals for 2017, and the balance of my complicated career. Wonderful, but complicated. May the path forward be as rewarding.

Happy New Year to you all.

*********************

Julie Hennrikus writes mysteries as Julianne Holmes and J. A. Hennrikus.

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